endless forms, most beautiful

Don't one-up someone else's story.

adulting:

If your buddy has just told you about something really embarrassing that he did, or complained about her stupid boss, or told you about how his last apartment was a nightmare, do not say any of the following:

"I’ve got an even better one."

"Something even worse happened to me!"

"That’s…

Parents and teachers would do well to think about various styles of discipline, management, or socialization in terms of what questions children are encouraged to ask in each instance. A strategy that relies on punishment or consequences prompts a child to wonder, “What am I supposed to do, and what will happen to me if I don’t do it?” A strategy based on rewards leads the child to ask, “What am I supposed to do, and what will I get for doing it?” The first thing that strikes us about these two questions is that they are at bottom not very different from each other. The second thing we realize is that neither gets a child anywhere close to the issues with which we are ultimately concerned. What we are after, I think, is children who ask themselves, “What kind of person do I want to be? — or even “What kind of classroom [or school, or family, or community] do *we* want to have?

—Alfie Kohn in Punished by Rewards: The Trouble with Gold Stars, Incentive Plans, A’s, Praises and Other Bribes (via positivelypersistentteach)

(Source: mumblrusa, via positivelypersistentteach)

ecosapienshow:

New episode! - An introduction to: Insect Orders 

We’ve all seen insects, right? Scuttling along the forest floor, buzzing between flowers, or simply basking in the sun. But what are the different types and how are they classified? Phil gets to grips with taxonomy and illustrates some common critters you might see on your travels.

(via sagansense)

sagansense:

astronomy-to-zoology:

what is this monster?

Its a Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois), a type of polychaete worm

Read more about the discovery of a 10-foot-long Bobbit Worm via Wired, watch the Bobbit Worm in action, and good luck sleeping…
This is Eunice aphroditois, also known as the bobbit worm, a mix between the Mongolian death worm, the Graboids from Tremors, the Bugs from Starship Troopers, and a rainbow — but it’s a really dangerous rainbow, like in Mario Kart. And it hunts in pretty much the most nightmarish way imaginable, digging itself into the sea floor, exposing a few inches of its body — which can grow to 10 feet long — and waiting.

Using five antennae, the bobbit worm senses passing prey, snapping down on them with supremely muscled mouth parts, called a pharynx. It does this with such speed and strength that it can split a fish in two. And that, quite frankly, would be a merciful exit. If you survive initially, you get to find out what it’s like to be yanked into the worm’s burrow and into untold nightmares.
A Daily Mail story suggested that the bobbit worm can permanently paralyze human appendages with its bristles, though Carrera-Parra and Salazar-Vallejo question this. They say a different family of worms, the fireworms, have harpoon-shaped chaetae — bristles of sorts — that release a toxin that can cause severe skin irritation, but bobbit worms “do not have abundant chaetae and their chaetae are not used for defensive purposes, but for improving traction for crawling over the sediment or inside their galleries or tubes.”

sagansense:

astronomy-to-zoology:

what is this monster?

Its a Bobbit Worm (Eunice aphroditois), a type of polychaete worm

Read more about the discovery of a 10-foot-long Bobbit Worm via Wired, watch the Bobbit Worm in action, and good luck sleeping…

This is Eunice aphroditois, also known as the bobbit worm, a mix between the Mongolian death worm, the Graboids from Tremors, the Bugs from Starship Troopers, and a rainbow — but it’s a really dangerous rainbow, like in Mario Kart. And it hunts in pretty much the most nightmarish way imaginable, digging itself into the sea floor, exposing a few inches of its body — which can grow to 10 feet long — and waiting.

Using five antennae, the bobbit worm senses passing prey, snapping down on them with supremely muscled mouth parts, called a pharynx. It does this with such speed and strength that it can split a fish in two. And that, quite frankly, would be a merciful exit. If you survive initially, you get to find out what it’s like to be yanked into the worm’s burrow and into untold nightmares.

A Daily Mail story suggested that the bobbit worm can permanently paralyze human appendages with its bristles, though Carrera-Parra and Salazar-Vallejo question this. They say a different family of worms, the fireworms, have harpoon-shaped chaetae — bristles of sorts — that release a toxin that can cause severe skin irritation, but bobbit worms “do not have abundant chaetae and their chaetae are not used for defensive purposes, but for improving traction for crawling over the sediment or inside their galleries or tubes.

The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man.

Charles Darwin (via whats-out-there)